Wednesday, 30 April 2008

Game articles in the Guardian

Yay! I have lost my Guardian-published virginity at last. It's on the use of commercial video games in schools and education:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/apr/29/games.schools

(Thinks) Does this - getting published in The Guardian - make me a lefty-liberal? Should I write an article for The Telegraph for left-right balance?

Also in the Guardian today, there's a better article by Richard Bartle, about how non-gamers are becoming a steadily smaller minority, both in terms of numbers and socio-political influence:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/apr/28/games.censorship

3 comments:

  1. Robin Helweg-Larsen30 April 2008 at 03:03

    I came for the article, I stayed for the blog! My heart is in Scotland in April if the weather is half-decent. I have MacLeod of Lewes ancestry but have never been there yet. I half-envy you.The article was interesting, as part of the trend toward games at all levels of education. We specialise in the corporate market, with some University clients as well - our business games are physical board-game in nature, with each team having their own board to represent their business, competing against each other in the classroom.http://income-outcome.com/They also have electronic applications. As the board is, in one sense, just an Income Statement and Balance Sheet, we can model real-world companies in game format.http://www.income-outcome.com/visualizer.htmlAnd we have created a matching business glossary.http://www.income-outcome.com/glossary.htmThere's a 4-minute video explanation here, if it's of interest:http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8294333890134087847&hl=enWe're based in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, but we teach business finance and decision-making skills to managers and sales forces of Fortune 500 clients around the world, in 12 languages, through our network of Distributors.We absolutely believe games are the future of education, just as they have always been the early childhood foundation of education.Whether they at some point become a common alternative for life itself is an interesting extrapolation...

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  2. All those games consoles need electricty and will just add to global warming. You should really be encouraging renewable teaching resources, such as chalk boards :p

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  3. and don't forget the slates! Better still get those kids working on the croft when they reach their sixth birthday!

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